COVID-19 and Domestic Violence

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Sheltering Survivors During COVID-19

Update on Domestic Violence Work During COVID-19

Like most of you, YWCA Glendale has been laser focused on the news of the evolving coronavirus pandemic. As a provider of emergency and social services for the most vulnerable members of our community, we understand that we play a critical role in maintaining both the health and safety of those seeking our services. We are classified as an essential business under the Safer at Home Orders for the State of California and Los Angeles County; our domestic violence shelter will remain open during this time. We have shifted all community services: counseling, legal and case management to online video conferencing and phone calls, but will see some clients on a case by case basis by appointment only. We encourage all clients with questions to call: 1-(888)-999-7511.

Our curbside grocery pick up program will continue serving families in our domestic violence shelter and community programs and families in Door of Hope’s shelter program (our local domestic violence transitional shelter partner) during COVID-19. Please call 818-242-4155 to schedule any drop offs of food donations for this program.

Based on the evolving response to COVID-19, in Los Angeles County and the State of California, we have taken additional steps to protect our clients, staff, and community:

  • In an effort to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 in our communal living environment, we have immediately suspended receiving in kind donations outside of cleaning products and non perishable food items at our Lexington headquarters. If you wish to help, please donate financially or donate the following items: general cleaning supplies, hand soap, paper towels, lysol wipes, lysol spray, hand sanitizer, diapers, and non perishable food items. You can leave these at our front door for a contactless drop off, Monday-Thursday 9AM-1PM or purchase them through our Amazon emergency wish list and they will be directly delivered to us.  
  • Instructions have been provided to our clients about how they should respond if they experience flu like symptoms and a COVID-19 shelter plan has been implemented to safely house survivors. 

Articles on COVID-19 and Domestic Violence featuring YWCA Glendale:

Los Angeles Times; 8/12/20 Op-Ed: Angelina Jolie: Why Children Suffer More Violence During COVID-19

Los Angeles Times; 4/6/20 YWCA postpones Legacy Luncheon, using digital outreach to contact supporters

Los Angeles Times; 3/24/20: Domestic abuse victims in ‘worst-case scenario’ during outbreak, providers say

Jezebel; 3/19/20: ‘Home Isn’t a Safe Place for Everyone’: How Coronavirus Is Impacting Domestic Violence Shelters 

Resources for Survivors compiled by the National Health Resource Center on Domestic Violence at Futures Without Violence:

  • Remember that you are not alone and supports remain available to you
    • The National Domestic Violence Hotline is 24/7, confidential and free:1-800-799-7233 and through chat.
    • The National Sexual Assault Hotline is 24/7, confidential and free:800.656.HOPE (4673) and through chat.
    • The StrongHearts Native Helpline for domestic/sexual violence is available 7am-10pm CT, confidential, and specifically for Native communities:1?844-762-8483
    • The Trans LifeLine for peer support for trans folks 9am-3am CT:1-877-565-8860 This hotline is staffed exclusively by trans operators is the only crisis line with a policy against non-consensual active rescue.
    • The Deaf Hotline is available 24/7 through video phone (1-855-812-1001), email and chat for Deaf, DeafBlind, DeafDisabled survivors.
    • National Parent Helpline Monday -Friday 12pm-9am CT emotional support and advocacy for parents:1-855-2736
  • Sheltering in Place recommendations or restrictions may create additional difficulties and risks for survivors. If authorities call for “shelter in place” in your area, are there other friends or family you could stay with during this time? Consider reaching out to these people to make a plan:
    • Consider reaching out to a trusted friend, co-worker, or family member who could check in with you about your safety and support needs. If you need help identifying support people in your life, take a look at the pod mapping worksheet from the Bay Area Transformative Justice Collective.
    • Are you connected with close friends or family members of the person who is hurting you? Are they aware of what is happening or are they a safe person to reach out to? Consider connecting with them now in case you need someone to help you in an emergency.
  • Domestic Violence Community Watchlist PDF

Safety Plans and Self-Care:

Community Care: